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    • 01 JUN 16
    • 0

    5 Dental Apps That Will Keep Your Oral Health on Track

    Young beautiful brunette lady touching and browsing her smart phone at home

    Mobile Apps That Keep Your Smile Bright and Mouth Clean

    Many mobile dental applications are available free, others are free to download but require a paid upgrade or annual subscription for full functionality, and some apps must be purchased. Fees can be as nominal as 99 cents or range into the hundreds of dollars. According to WebMD, as well as countless other reliable medical resources, medical professionals constantly find direct links with dental health and heart health. If you need a little help keeping up on your dental health, need some help managing your plan or meds, or just would like to know more in general about keeping your mouth clean, check out these helpful apps.

    eProcrates Rx

    Dental patients with prescriptions find the most benefit from this app. With eProcrates Rx, you get a free mobile clinical reference library. You’ll find a drug guide, drug interaction checker, and information on drug formulas. It constantly updates and gives relevant medical news. You can download versions that include other types of information, such as alternative medicines, insurance codes, diagnostic tests, disease diagnosis and a medical dictionary, but that extra information costs anywhere from $99 to $199 per year. One of the best parts about this app is that it tells you dosage information, interactions, and contraindications.

    iRomexis

    iRomexis offers a comprehensive image viewer for the iPad that works with both 2D and 3D images. It can display any image it gets from Planmeca X-ray units. With great resolution, you can take your X-rays to your home to look at as well as any other professional for a consultation. You can share the images on this map to any mobile device, meaning you can zoom and measure the images, as well as adjust the brightness and contrast, and take a snapshot of any angle.

    DDS GP

    Like iRomexis, DDS GP designers made the app with dentists in mind. It’s designed to help dentists and patients make a dental treatment plan for their diagnosis. It’s great if you want to fully understand your diagnosis and do the best you can to treat it and prevent any further issues. You’ll find a plethora of topics spanning the dental industry, as well as a drawing board. Bring this app or suggest it to your dentist and see what they come up with. It’s a great source of information.

    Lexi-Dental Complete

    Lexi-Dental Complete gives you a full library filled with dental resources. These resources include drug information and effects, patient resources, photos of dental procedures and conditions, information on diagnostic procedures, natural product information, Stedman’s Medical Dictionary and a dental office emergency handbook. Though it lands on the pricey side, you can download it for a free 30-day trial. Otherwise, you’ll have to shell out $285 annually; a reasonable price considering the resources available.

    If you’re not satisfied with that, you can also try checking out Kool Smiles’ information on their website, dedicated to helping spread dental care and education globally. They focus on the dental divide, with a goal to even the playing field and allow everybody the same access to dental health. They spend millions of dollars every year towards providing free dental services for those who can’t afford to pay for it.

    My Smile

    This simple little app allows you to compare your smile to a 15-shade tooth palate, letting you know where your teeth fall in the range of colors. Just keep in mind when using the app that the quality, angle, and lighting of the photo you use have an effect on where you’ll land on the chart. It works best as a relative scale.

    Remember, no matter how you do it, it’s important to keep up on your dental health. Find what method works for you; just make sure you don’t slack on cleaning your mouth. After all, you do use it to kiss people.

    Sources: WorlDental.org, WebMD

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