• Is Thumbsucking Bad for Your Child’s Teeth?

    5 Quick Tips to Help Them Break the Habit and Avoid Tooth Problems

    Stop-Thumb-Sucking2Thumbsucking is a natural reflex for children. Sucking on thumbs, fingers, pacifiers or other objects may make babies feel secure and happy and help them learn about their world. Young children may also suck to soothe themselves and help them fall asleep.

    However, after the permanent teeth come in, sucking may cause problems with the proper growth of the mouth and alignment of the teeth. It can also cause changes in the roof of the mouth. Pacifiers can affect the teeth essentially the same ways as sucking fingers and thumbs, but it is often an easier habit to break. The intensity of the sucking is a factor that determines whether or not dental problems may result. If children rest their thumbs passively in their mouths, they are less likely to have difficulty than those who vigorously suck their thumbs. Some aggressive thumbsuckers may develop problems with their baby (primary) teeth.

    Children usually stop sucking between the ages of two and four years old, or by the time the permanent front teeth are ready to erupt. If you notice changes in your child’s primary teeth, or are concerned about your child’s thumbsucking consult your dentist at Personal Care Dentistry.

    Tips for helping your child stop thumbsucking:

    • Praise your child for not sucking.
    • Children often suck their thumbs when feeling insecure or needing comfort. Focus on correcting the cause of the anxiety and provide comfort to your child.
    • For an older child, involve him or her in choosing the method of stopping.
    • Your dentist at Personal Care Dentistry can offer encouragement to your child and explain what could happen to their teeth if they do not stop sucking.
    • If the above tips don’t work, remind the child of their habit by bandaging the thumb or putting a sock on the hand at night. Your dentist or pediatrician may prescribe a bitter medication to coat the thumb or the use of a mouth appliance.

    SOURCE: American Dental Association

  • Practicing Golden Rule Dentistry

    Dr. Walter Hunt Always Strives to Provide the Best Care Possible

    Most people are familiar with the Golden Rule – do unto others as you would have them do unto you, which is found in the Bible (Matt. 7:12). And most of Personal Care Dentistry’s patients know that the Golden Rule guides the dentists and staff at the clinic when they are assisting or treating patients. But when did Dr. Walter Hunt, DDS, the founder of the practice, start implementing the Golden Rule as a driving force at Personal Care Dentistry?

    dr-hunt-homepageFrom the first day he opened his practice in 1977 on Hamline Avenue, Dr. Hunt emphasized Golden Rule Dentistry.  According to Dr. Hunt, Our practice has always taken the time to really listen to our patients and provide close, personal attention to best customize their care. I know the kind of care that I demand as a patient, and that is the kind of care that I strive to provide. I call it ‘Golden Rule Dentistry.’ It is a philosophy shared by all of our staff members.”

    But you have to go back even further than 1977 to learn about how and why he developed his approach to dentistry that focuses on compassionate care.  Dr. Hunt grew up in northwestern Indiana in a town named Merrillville. By the time his family moved to Minnesota at the beginning of his junior year of high school, he had become an accomplished athlete in both football and baseball. It was then that he also reached a defining moment in his life, one that has influenced his approach to life and dentistry.

    My family didn’t have much money we lived in a poor neighborhood in Merrillville so I had a lot of friends who were also poor. But because I was a good athlete, I also had a group of friends who came from families with money. And I didn’t like the way the kids with money would treat the poor kids. It was then that I vowed that I would always treat everyone equally with the same amount of caring and respect, emphasizes Dr. Hunt. The worth of a person should not be defined by what they have or how they look.

    For Dr. Hunt, being a dentist and the founder of Personal Care Dentistry is not a job. It is a passion. He has had the same goal for almost half a century treat people with dignity and respect, and as a dentist, provide them with the best care possible.

    This is my passion, and this is how I can contribute to helping other people have better lives. Even today, I still feel like I get more out of caring

  • We Practice the Golden Rule

    New Patients Can Experience the Personal Care Dentistry Difference for $69

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    At Personal Care Dentistry, we care for our patients the same way we would care for our families – with compassion, respect and the highest quality. For 37 years, we’ve blended the latest technology with a gentle touch in a warm, caring atmosphere. Come experience the difference at Personal Care Dentistry by using the New Patient Special Voucher for a cleaning, X-rays and exam by one of our dentists. Just print the page or bring in your smartphone or tablet and show us the coupon from our mobile site. Whatever you do, make an appointment today!

    Personal Care Dentistry:

    • Emergency Same-Day Appointments available
    • Early Morning & Evening Appointments available
    • We accept most insurance
    • Financing available

    Providing:

    • Gentle cleanings
    • Lasting crowns and bridges
    • Nonsurgical gum care
    • Dentures and partials
    • Cosmetic whitening, bonding and veneers
    • TMJ solutions
    • Implants
    • Invisalign clear braces

    Personal Care Dentistry

    2233 North Hamline Avenue, Suite 320, Roseville, MN 55113

    Phone: 651-636-0655

  • Healthy Teeth for Life: 10 Tips for Families

    Keep a Sparkling Smile From Childhood to Old Age

    There are so many good reasons to keep your family’s teeth and gums healthy. Their sparkling smiles. Being able to chew for good nutrition. Avoiding toothaches and discomfort. And new research suggests that gum disease can lead to other problems in the body, including increased risk of heart disease.

    Happy-family-of-four-smiling-300x135In fact, most experts agree that almost all tooth decay and most gum disease can be prevented with good oral hygiene. We’re talking about taking a few minutes each day to brush and floss. That’s not a lot in return for a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums.

    Fortunately, there are simple ways to keep teeth strong and healthy from childhood to old age. Here’s how:

    1. Start children early. Once that first tooth appears usually around six months you should begin a child’s dental care. Teeth can be wiped with a clean, damp cloth or a very soft brush. At about age 2, you can let kids try brushing for themselves — although it’s important to supervise. Start early and avoid your child being part of the 50% of children between the ages of 12 and 15 who have cavities.

    2. Seal off trouble. Permanent molars come in around age 6. Thin protective coatings applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth can prevent decay in the pits and fissures. Yet only one in three U.S. kids receives dental sealants. Talk to your dentist at Personal Care Dentistry.

    3. Use fluoride. Fluoride strengthens enamel, making it less likely to decay. Three out of four Americans drink water that is fluoridated. If your water isn’t fluoridated (i.e. you drink bottled water), talk to your dentist at Personal Care Dentistry, who may suggest putting a fluoride application on your teeth. Many toothpastes and mouth rinses also contain fluoride.

    flossbrush4. Brush twice a day and floss daily. Gum disease and tooth decay remain big problems — and not just for older people. Three-fourths of teenagers have gums that bleed, according to the American Dental Hygienists’ Association. Also remember to change your toothbrush 3 to 4 times a year.

    5. Rinse or chew gum after meals. In addition to brushing and flossing, rinsing your mouth with an antibacterial rinse can help prevent decay and gum problems. Chewing sugar-free gum after a meal can also protect by increasing saliva flow, which naturally washes bacteria away and neutralizes acid.

    6. Block blows to teeth. Most school teams now require children to wear mouth guards. But remember: unsupervised recreational activities like skate-boarding and roller-blading can also result in injuries. Your dentist can make a custom-fitted mouth guard.

    7. Don’t smoke or use smokeless tobacco. Tobacco stains teeth and significantly increases the risk of gum disease and oral cancer. If you smoke or use chewing tobacco, consider quitting. Counsel your kids not to start.

    8. Eat smart. At every age, a healthy diet is essential to healthy teeth and gums. A well-balanced diet of whole foods — including grains, nuts, fruits and vegetables, and dairy products — will provide all the nutrients you need for healthy teeth and gums. Some researchers believe that omega-3 fats, the kind found in fish, may also reduce inflammation, thereby lowering risk of gum disease.

    images-of-pop9. Avoid sugary foods. When bacteria in the mouth break down simple sugars, they produce acids that can erode tooth enamel, opening the door to decay. Sugary drinks, including soft drinks and fruit drinks, pose a special threat because people tend to sip them, raising acid levels over a long period of time. Sticky candies are another culprit, because they linger on teeth surfaces.

    10. Make an appointment. Most experts recommend a dental check-up every 6 months — more often if you have problems like gum disease. During a routine exam, your dental hygienist will remove plaque build-up that you can’t brush or floss away and look for signs of decay. They will also look for early signs of oral cancer, wear and tear from teeth grinding, and signs of gum disease.

    SOURCE: WebMD