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    • 22 FEB 17
    • 0

    8 Facts About Fluoride You Should Know

    Young woman portrait

    What is fluoride?

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring mineral compound found in water and soil. It is also present in foods and beverages at varying concentrations. Fluoride helps prevent tooth decay by making the entire tooth surface more resistant to acid attacks from the bacteria that live in the plaque on your teeth. Fluoride also promotes remineralization (adding minerals such as calcium back in to your teeth), which aids in repairing early decay before a cavity (hole) forms in the tooth. There are two ways to increase fluoride protection: topical and systemic applications.

    What is topical fluoride?

    Topical fluoride is applied directly to and absorbed by the surface of the teeth. It is found in personal oral hygiene products such as toothpastes and mouth rinses, which contain a safe and effective concentration of fluoride to fight tooth decay. These products are rinsed from the mouth without swallowing.

    Professionally administered topical fluorides such as foams, gels or varnishes are applied by a dentist and left on for a few minutes, usually during a cleaning treatment. For patients with a high risk of cavities, the dentist may prescribe a special gel or toothpaste for daily home use.

    What is systemic fluoride?

    Systemic fluoride is taken into the body through consuming fluoridated water, fluoride supplements or foods and beverages. Once systemic fluoride is absorbed via the gastrointestinal tract, the blood distributes it throughout the entire body. Fluoride is then deposited into unerupted, developing teeth. Systemic fluoride is also found in saliva and it continually bathes the teeth, providing a topical application to protect teeth.

    How do I know if my toothpaste contains fluoride?

    Check the label on your toothpaste to see if fluoride is an ingredient. You should also check for the ADA (American Dental Association) Seal of Approval to ensure that your toothpaste contains the proper amount of fluoride. If it’s not fluoridated, consider switching.

    What is fluoridated water?

    Water fluoridation is the adjustment of fluoride levels in the community water supply to the optimum level to protect oral health. By simply drinking tap water in communities with a fluoridated water supply, people can benefit from fluoride’s protection from decay. Research for the past 60 years has shown community water fluoridation to be safe and the single most effective public health measure to prevent tooth decay in adults and children. Water fluoridation is endorsed by nearly every major national and international health organization including the American Dental Association, American Medical Association, World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

    How do I find out if the water in my community is fluoridated?

    The easiest and most accurate way to find out is to contact your local water company and ask. The CDC web site also has a page “My Water’s Fluoride” that allows consumers to learn the fluoridation status of their water system.

    What if I drink mostly bottled water?

    If most of your water comes in the form of bottled water, you are missing out on the valuable fluoride found in tap water, which helps to protect teeth from cavities. In most cases, the fluoride concentrations in bottled water (even in some that are fluoridated) fall below the U.S. government’s recommended range of 0.7-1.2 parts per million (ppm) of fluoride, the ideal range to prevent cavities. If you drink mostly bottled water, you should talk to the dentists or hygienists at Personal Care Dentistry about fluoride supplements (tablets or drops), fluoride mouth rinses and topical fluoride gels.

    Are children more sensitive to fluoride?

    Fluoride is absorbed easily into tooth enamel, especially in children’s developing teeth. In young children, excess fluoride intake can cause dental fluorosis, typically a harmless cosmetic discoloring or mottling of the enamel, visible as chalky white specks and lines or pitted and brown stained enamel on teeth.

    Parents should monitor the use of toothpaste, mouth rinses and fluoride supplements in young children to ensure they are not ingesting too much. Check with Personal Care Dentistry on the proper amount of toothpaste to use or the proper dosage of a fluoride supplement.

    If you are concerned about the fluoride levels in your drinking water, call the local public water department or your water supplier. If the source is a private well, request a fluoride content analysis from your local or county health department to ensure that the fluoride levels are within the proper range.

    SOURCE: Delta Dental

    • 14 FEB 17
    • 0

    Top Tips for Protecting Your Teeth

    Happy couple sitting on a couch at home and looking at camera

    Good Oral Health Habits to Guard Your Grin

    Good oral health not only protects the integrity of your teeth and gums but also ensures that your smile remains bright for years to come. Even if you brush and floss regularly, however, there are still some oral health concerns that you may end up facing. Whether a result of your lifestyle or your genetic endowment, these issues may be worrying and unpleasant, but they can all be addressed and managed.

    The Basics About Your Teeth

    To understand the problems you may face with your teeth, it is important to first understand what your teeth are made of. At the very center of the tooth lies a hollow area filled with nerves, blood vessels and other soft tissues. This is called the dental pulp. Surrounding the dental pulp is surrounded a hard, yellowish material called dentin. Covering the dentin below the level of the gums is a layer of hard tissue called cementum, while above the gum line the dentin is covered by the hard, smooth, white outer layer of the tooth: the enamel. Each tooth sits in a space in the jaw bone supported by ligaments and surrounded by the soft gingiva or gum tissue.

    What Are Gingivitis and Periodontitis?

    Healthy gums are usually light pink or coral, composed of firm orange peel textured tissues, and fitted closely to the teeth, following their contours and forming a scalloped edge. In this healthy state, gums will not bleed or cause discomfort during your daily oral hygiene routine, and there will be no visible redness or swelling. When plaque or tartar is allowed to accumulate along the gum line, however, these healthy tissues can become inflamed and painful. This development is called gingivitis.

    Regular visits to your dental hygienist and frequent self-checks can help catch and treat gum disease before it reaches irreversible levels. The best way to protect your gum health, however, is the maintenance of an effective oral health plan including regular brushing and flossing, use of a fluoridated toothpaste, and in some cases use of specialized mouth rinses.

    An Inside Look at Cavities

    In addition to gum health, good oral hygiene can help prevent tooth damage in the form of cavities. When bacteria are allowed to remain on your teeth over time, particularly in the spaces between teeth, their chemical output gradually eats away at the tooth enamel. Low salivary flow, consumption of sticky sugary foods, and large gaps between eating sugary foods and cleaning the teeth, can all increase the likelihood of cavity formation. The natural strength, shape, and positioning of your teeth may also affect your risk of cavities.

    Especially if you have a family history of weak enamel and frequent cavities, oral hygiene products containing fluoride will help to strengthen the tooth, harden your enamel, and even rebuild the tooth at the early stages of cavity formation. In combination with reducing problem foods such as candy and sticky starches like chips, and ensuring regular plaque removal, fluoride can help you maintain healthy cavity free teeth.

    Tooth Grinding 101

    Even with excellent oral hygiene, you may still face other dental concerns. Affecting 8% to 20% of the adult population, bruxism or teeth grinding can lead to a range of problems including tooth sensitivity, jaw pain, enamel erosion, and even the cracking and chipping of teeth. Most severe teeth grinding occurs during sleep and so can be very hard to diagnose until it reaches such severity that your partner can hear you grinding, or that you begin to suffer from pain, migraines, and visible tooth degradation.

    The cause of bruxism is still unclear but stress seems to play a role in the severity and frequency of episodes. Thus, stress reduction and behavioral change therapies may be helpful in reducing the impact of bruxism. Ultimately, however, there is no certain cure so most dentists will recommend the use of a custom dental night guard. These guards fit closely to your teeth and protect them from the erosion and pressure resulting from grinding.

    A Look at Mouth Guards

    Physical trauma through sporting activities can not only lead to bruises and broken bones, but can also cause dental injuries which are unsightly, painful, and expensive to repair. In any contact sport, a mouth guard and a helmet should be worn as default.

    Mouth guards for sport come in a variety of forms from the often large and clumsy (but cheapest) stock mouth guard, to boil and bite guards which allow a better fit through softening and molding to the teeth, and finally to custom mouth guards fitted precisely to your unique bite by your dentist. A custom mouth guard will offer the best fit and protection without inhibiting breathing or speech, but they do tend to be more expensive than other options. Regardless of cost, the most important features of a mouth guard are:

    Complete and durable protection for all your teeth;

    A good fit which ensures the guard won’t fall out if you get hit;

    No interference with breathing or speaking; and

    Comfortable.

    Once you’ve chosen a mouth guard that works for you, you can extend its lifespan by rinsing it in cold water after each use, occasionally cleaning it with soap and water, storing the guard in a closed container filled with water, and carefully watching for any signs of tearing or damage. As soon as you identify damage on the guard, it’s time to replace it to ensure the best protection of your teeth.

    Get Started with Healthy Teeth and Gums

    A healthy mouth is vital for comfortable eating and speaking, and for maintaining good self-esteem. Though there are many potential oral health concerns, most of them can be prevented or managed by good consistent oral hygiene practices such as twice-daily brushing with fluoride toothpaste and regular flossing. Dental professionals can treat oral health issues and can help you set up good oral health habits, but ultimately prevention starts with you making good choices in food and drink consumption and dental care.

    Sources: HealthLine.com, ProTeethGuard.com

     

    • 08 FEB 17
    • 0

    Tips to Keep Your Baby’s Teeth Healthy

    sweet baby girl holding bottle and drinking water

    When we think of healthy alternatives to soda and other sugary drinks, it’s often common to look to fruit juice as a solid choice. Generally high in essential vitamins, fruit juice can be a much better choice than other beverages. Unfortunately, it can also be one of the worst offenders. The sugars and citric acid found in most fruit juices cause double trouble for teeth, and can lead to tooth decay at an early age.

    A Lot More Sugar than You Think

    Apple juice can contain as much as 10 teaspoons of sugar per serving. That’s exactly the same amount as found in the leading cola. Grape juice contains even more, with nearly 15 teaspoons. Further, the citric acid in fruit juice can be tough on enamel, eating away at the first line of defense for healthy teeth.

    Moderation… And Water

    Consuming fruit juice isn’t in and of itself bad. Instead, the real problem is that we often simply consume too much juice or that we don’t rinse or brush afterwards. Children are especially at risk when juice is given too frequently. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that children have no more than 6 to 8 ounces of citrus fruit juice per day. Also, it’s important to limit your children’s consumption of juice to once a day, preferably with a meal, instead of spread out through the day, such as in a sippy cup. For the juice-lover in the family, two servings of watered down juice is a great way to satisfy a craving!

    Think Baby Teeth are Temporary and Not Important?

    Think again. Baby teeth are necessary for chewing, speaking, and smiling. They also serve as placeholders for the adult teeth. Referred to as baby bottle tooth decay, teeth are infected or lost too early due to cavities. If left untreated, pain and infection can result. Severely decayed teeth may need to be removed.

    Your child may develop poor eating habits, speech problems, crooked teeth, and damaged adult teeth. In addition, the chances that adult teeth will end up being crooked are greatly increased.

    Protecting Baby’s Developing Bite

    The good news is that a few simple steps can help stave off baby bottle tooth decay. They include implementing good oral hygiene at an early age. Here’s how:

    Wipe the baby’s gums with a clean gauze pad or washcloth after each feeding.

    Begin brushing your child’s teeth, without toothpaste, when his or her first tooth comes in. If you choose to use toothpaste, use a fluoride-free one.

    Clean and massage gums in areas without teeth.

    Floss once all the baby teeth have come in.

    Make sure your child is getting enough fluoride, which helps lessen cavities. If your local water supply does not contain fluoride, ask your dentist or doctor if you need to use a supplement.

    Schedule regular dental visits by your child’s first birthday. Dentists also offer special sealant coatings, which can help prevent tooth decay in children.

    Sources: KidsHeathyTeeth.com, WebMD

    • 03 FEB 17
    • 0

    Personal Care Dentistry Provides Easy Financing Options

    Personal Care Dentistry is pleased to offer financing opportunities through the health services credit cards CareCredit and Chase Bank Healthcare Finance.

    Care+Credit+ImageCareCredit is a personal line of credit that can be used for various healthcare treatments and procedures- not just dentistry. CareCredit offers no-interest financing to qualified applicants, and payment plans with low, fixed interest rates. Call us or visit the CareCredit website to learn more.

    CareCredit offers Two Types of Payment Plans:

    6 or 12 Month No Interest Payment Plans

    Pay for treatment over 6 or 12 months with no Interest.

    As long as you pay the low minimum monthly payment each month when due, and the balance in full by the end of the 6 or 12 month term, no interest will be charged on your purchase.

    24 to 60 Month Low Interest Payment Plans (14.90% APR)

    Enjoy low minimum monthly payments with the 24, 36, 48, or 60 month plans. The 14.90% annual percentage rate is lower than average credit cards and makes convenient, fixed, low minimum monthly payments possible.

    For amounts of $1,000 or more on 24, 36 and 48 months, and for $2,500 or more on 60 months.

    These credit providers also allow friends or relatives to co-sign for patients, in the event a co-signer is required for approval.

    Credit applications for either of these health services credit options are quick and easy to complete. Simply fill out the application and Personal Care Dentistry will call it in for you.

    Call us at (651) 636-0655 or visit the CareCredit website for complete offer details.

    • 01 FEB 17
    • 0

    Essential Tips to Manage a Dental Emergency

    Frustrated young man touching his cheek and keeping eyes closed while sitting on the couch at home

    What to Do If a Dental Problem Requires Immediate Treatment

    Accidents happen, and knowing what to do when one occurs can mean the difference between saving and losing a tooth.

    Knocked-Out Tooth

    A knocked-out tooth is a dental emergency that requires urgent attention. If the appropriate emergency steps are followed immediately after the tooth has been knocked out, the chances are very good that the tooth can be reinserted and preserved by your dentist.

    Pick up the tooth by the top (crown) of the tooth. Do not touch the root(s) of the tooth.

    Rinse the tooth off very gently to ensure that it’s clean. Do not scrub the tooth or remove any tissue attached to it. Be sure to place a towel or washcloth in the sink so that the tooth does not go down the drain.

    If you can, gently place the tooth back into the socket. Hold it gently in place while trying to bite down.

    If you can’t place the tooth back in the socket, put the tooth in a small container or in a cup of milk. Note that the latter is preferable.

    Call your dentist immediately, since getting to the dentist quickly with your tooth – in addition to following the steps above – is critical for saving the knocked-out tooth. The longer you wait to re-implant the tooth in its socket, the less chance you have of the tooth “taking” and remaining viable.

    Loose Tooth, Tooth Out of Alignment

    If you have a tooth that is loose or out of alignment, you should call your dentist for an emergency appointment right away. In the meantime, you can try to put the tooth back in its original position using your finger with very light pressure. Do not try and force it. You can bite down to keep the tooth from moving. Your dentist may want to splint the tooth to the adjacent teeth (the teeth on each side) to keep it stabilized.

    Chipped, Cracked or Fractured Teeth

    If a tooth is chipped and doesn’t hurt, this usually does not constitute a dental emergency and you can wait a few days to see a dentist. However, it is important to be careful while chewing so as not to chip it more. Your dentist may simply be able to smooth the chip out, or add some composite filling material to repair the tooth.

    A cracked or fractured tooth is a serious issue constituting a dental emergency. Fractured or cracked teeth usually suggest that damage has occurred to the inside of the tooth as well as to the outside. Severe fractures are so extreme that the tooth cannot be saved. If you suffer a fractured tooth, call your dentist immediately for an emergency appointment and follow these steps:

    Clean your mouth out by gently rinsing thoroughly with warm water.

    If the fracture is caused by facial trauma, apply a cold compress to the area to minimize any swelling.

    Take acetaminophen (not aspirin) according to the packaging directions to alleviate pain.

    Never apply a painkiller to the gum because it can burn the gum tissue. This includes Orajel, which often is marketed for these types of procedures.

    An X-ray will be needed in order for your dentist to properly diagnose the condition of your tooth. If the soft tissue inside of the tooth (the tooth pulp) is damaged, your tooth may need a root canal. If the pulp is not damaged, the tooth might only need a crown.

    Some dentists make some of their permanent crowns in-office and place them in the same day; other dentists use an outside laboratory to make the crown. In this case you will have to wear a temporary crown while the laboratory makes a permanent crown. If the tooth cannot be saved, your dentist will inform you of the various alternatives for replacing missing teeth, such as implant-supported restorations and bridges.

    Other Dental Emergencies

    Basically, any dental problem that requires immediate treatment in order to save a tooth, stop ongoing tissue bleeding or alleviate severe pain is considered a dental emergency.

    A severe infection or abscess in the mouth can be life-threatening and should be dealt with immediately. Your dentist might be able to perform the first stage of a root canal, or will refer you to an endodontist (root canal specialist) to open and drain the tooth and allow the abscess to drain. If your dentist can’t be reached, seek hospital emergency room care.

    Dental Emergency while Traveling

    If you are planning to travel out of the country or leaving for an extended vacation, during which you may not have ready access to dental care, it is important to see your dentist for a routine check-up before you leave. Your dentist can make sure that you don’t have any loose crowns or teeth, decay close to the nerve of a tooth that could cause you pain or develop into an abscess or other problems that could be easily fixed before becoming a dental emergency later.

    For more information about safe care in the event of a dental emergency while traveling, contact the Organization for Safety and Asepsis Procedures (OSAP), or the International Association for Medical Assistance to Travelers (IAMAT).

    Being Prepared for a Dental Emergency

    Because a dental emergency can happen at any time and place, the best thing to do is be prepared and don’t panic. Pack and keep with you a small dental first aid kit containing the following:

    Small container with a lid

    Name and phone number of your dentist

    Acetaminophen (not aspirin or ibuprofen because they can act as a blood thinner and cause excessive bleeding during a dental emergency).

    Gauze

    Handkerchief

    Sources: MouthHealthy.org (ADA), YourDentistryGuide.com

     

    • 25 JAN 17
    • 0

    Baby Bottle Do’s and Don’ts to Avoid Child Cavities

    Portrait of a baby drinking from bottle with mother smiling

    A Great Place to Prevent Cavities is in Your Child’s Baby Bottle

    Follow these steps to help keep your infant cavity-free.

    Don’t: Put Sugary Drinks in Your Child’s Baby Bottle

    Putting sugary beverages such as fruit juice or sports drinks in your infant’s bottle is not recommended. High amounts of sugar can lead to tooth decay and cause more dental problems as their teeth begin to appear. Cavities in baby teeth can also cause complications in new adult teeth.

    Do: Wipe out Their Mouth after Meals

    With a damp, clean cloth, wipe out your child’s mouth 15 minutes after each meal – liquid or solid. Doing so keeps their mouth free of sugar and debris that can lead to cavities.

    Don’t: Send Them to Bed with a Bottle

    While a bedtime bottle may comfort your infant, it can be very destructive for their gums and developing teeth. When left in your children’s mouth, sugar from breast milk, formula and milk can lead to infection and pain. Try to establish a bedtime routine that doesn’t involve a baby bottle.

    Do: Let Them to Have a Drink before Bed

    A good way to get your child off of the bedtime bottle is by giving them a long drink before bedtime. This sort of routine will get them accustomed to having a drink right before bed, and prevent them from craving a bedtime bottle.

    Don’t: Heat Their Bottle in the Microwave

    Microwaves are convenient and quick, but they shouldn’t be used to heat a bottle full of formula. Not only does a microwave heat formula unevenly, it can get formula too hot to drink. Additionally, the extreme heat from microwaves can damage and wear plastic baby bottles.

    Do: Heat Their Bottle in a Pot of Warm Water

    The best way to warm bottled formula is in a pot full of water upon the stove. To do this, fill a pot that is tall enough to completely cover their bottle. Warm the pot on a low-medium setting for 4 – 5 minutes. Then, place the bottle in the water and let it heat up for 1 – 2 minutes. Before serving your infant, check the temperature of the formula by putting a dab on the inside of your forearm to make sure that it isn’t too hot.

    Don’t: Let Them Walk around with Their Baby Bottle

    As your child begins walking, they’ll also begin falling, which is why you shouldn’t let newly mobile children walk with their bottle. Did you know that every 4 hours a child in America visits the hospital because a facial injury as a result of falling while holding a bottle? You can avoid this by not giving them a walking around bottle, and having them sit down before they drink.

    Do: Teach them to Drink from Lidless Cups

    You should begin weaning your child off of their bottle around the time that they begin walking – typically ages 12 – 18 months. A good way to do this is by transitioning to a sipping cup, or by letting them drink from lidless cups at meal time. There will be some spilling at first, so try to only give your child water, or a sugarless beverage that’s easy to clean. Introducing them to adult cups at an early age will help them rely less upon the bottle, and diminish the likelihood of them sustaining an injury as a result of walking with a baby bottle.

    Check up on Cavities Every Six Months

    The best way to prevent childhood tooth decay is by establishing a dental home for your child before their first birthday. Familiarizing them with a pediatric dentist early on will help your child get more comfortable visiting the dentist and keeping their mouths clean. After finding a dental home, visit the pediatric dentist every six months to make sure that their mouths are staying clean!

    Source: Healthychildren.org

     

     

    • 18 JAN 17
    • 0

    Should Your Child Floss Their Teeth?

    Cute girl cleaning teeth by flossEvery Child’s Smile is Unique – Find the Right Floss for Them

    Brushing teeth alone only cleans the visible areas and misses out on the spaces between teeth and leaves your child vulnerable to acid buildup and tooth decay. But don’t worry! We want to help you find the right floss for the specific needs of your child.

    Does Your Child Have Gaps in Their Teeth?

    If so, then dental tape is a great solution to floss the hard-to-reach spaces in their teeth. Dental tape is wide, flat and designed to be gentle on exposed gums. The width of dental tape makes it easier for small hands to grasp it, and makes it more forgiving when children use too much pressure while flossing.

    Are Their Teeth Tightly Bunched?

    Teeth that have no visible gaps can be hard to floss because of the limited space. If your child has such teeth, then waxed floss might be the best flossing solution. Waxed floss is thinner than dental tape, and the waxy nature is designed to glide easier between tightly bunched teeth. Because waxed floss is on the thin side, it is important that your child applies less force when flossing so that they don’t mistakenly cut their gums.

    Do They Have Braces?

    Braces and other orthodontic appliances can cause floss to shred, and also make it difficult to reach the nooks and crannies of teeth that require flossing. If your child has braces, then we suggest that they floss with a floss threader – a device designed to help those with braces floss. Floss threaders make it easier to reach the spaces in teeth impeded by braces and orthodontic appliances. Spongy floss is another great option for those that have oral appliances.

    Varied Spacing Between Teeth?

    If your child has different sized spaces between their teeth, then ultra floss is the choice for you! Ultra floss can stretch thin to clean between tightly bunched teeth, but is also wide enough to comfortably clean wider spaces. Ultra floss is a waxed dental floss that slides easily between teeth of all shapes and sizes and is marked by its ability to stretch into a thinner size.

    Most Importantly, Floss Daily

    Regardless of the floss you choose for your child, the most important thing is that they floss daily. You can help them at first to ensure that they are flossing properly and thoroughly cleaning between their teeth.

    Does your child have bleeding gums from flossing? If so, they could be developing gingivitis. Bring them into our office for a comprehensive oral exam. During their visit, we will thoroughly evaluate the state of their oral health and provide a range of treatment solutions based upon our conclusions. Visit our office today to help your child earn a great, healthy smile that they will proudly enjoy for the rest of their life!

    Source: KidsHealthyTeeth.com

    • 17 JAN 17
    • 0

    Dental Anxiety? Personal Care Dentistry Can Help Overcome Your Fears

    iStock_000019127467_Large - dental fearHere’s what dental patients who suffer from dental anxiety had to say about their experience at Personal Care Dentistry.

    Soooo Thankful – Jonie R.

    “I don’t enjoy going to the dentist. I have become anxious and slightly scared with dentists. However, I am so thankful for this group of professionals. They have really helped me over my fear and I am confident in the work I have had done.” – January 13, 2017

    Krista is the Best – Michele M.

    ”My 3 year old son has high anxiety about the dentist. I’ve taken him to a pediatric dentist twice and both times it was a nightmare. They weren’t able to clean his teeth. I decided to take him to Personal Care Dentistry because my husband and I are both patients and love all of the staff. Krista was my son’s hygienist and she was amazing with him. She was warm and funny while still being professional. She made the entire time enjoyable and did a great job cleaning his teeth. Not one tear and all smiles. Dr. Kyle came in to check on him and also did a great job putting him at ease. Personal Care Dentistry is excellent and is now our entire family’s dentist office.” – January 6, 2017

    Excellent Care by Hygienist Carrie and Dr Hunt – Shannon J.

    “Since I started having my teeth cleaned at Personal Care Dentistry I have not needed to use the gas to get through it. This is a huge thing for me as I don’t experience the pain with my cleanings now.” – November 30, 2016

    Superb Care and Quality Work – Jennifer S.

    “I had to get a couple of fillings and was very nervous about it, and the assistant suggested we use nitrous to help take the edge off. She coached me through the whole procedure and ensured that I was doing okay.” – November 18 2016

    Very Friendly Service – Shoua X.

    “The staff at Personal Care Dentistry are WONDERFUL and SUPER FRIENDLY. I was a little nervous but the hygienist explained everything to me so I knew exactly what she was doing and what to expect; that quickly calmed my nerves. Also, since I was a first-timer and not insured they gave me a HUGE discount – THANK YOU PERSONAL CARE DENTISTRY!!!” – November 10, 2016

    Friendly and Warm Service – Trisha H.

    “My 4 year old was crying right before she went in to the operatory and Lindsey made her feel comfortable right away! Ruth came home and said she was excited to come back again. Great job!!” – October 27, 2016

     

     

    • 11 JAN 17
    • 0

    12 Tips to Brighten Your Smile in the New Year

    Portrait of young woman smiling in the winter,grain added

    Resolve to Restore Your Smile

    Have your pearly whites lost their luster because of dingy gray or yellow stains? Stained teeth can occur as we age, but some common foods, drinks, and even mouthwashes can stain teeth. Do-it-yourself remedies can help whiten teeth, and avoiding substances that stain teeth can stop further discoloration. Use these secrets to whiter teeth to restore your bright smile.

    1. Go on a white-teeth diet

    If you’re quaffing red wine and black tea, or smoking cigarettes or cigars, expect the results to show up as not-so-pearly whites. Other culprits to blame for dingy teeth include colas, gravies, and dark juices. Bottom line: If it’s dark before you put it in your mouth, it will probably stain your teeth. Brush immediately after eating or drinking foods that stain teeth and use a good bleaching agent, either over-the-counter or in the dentist’s office.

    1. Chuck your toothbrush…

    …or change the head of your electric toothbrush at least every two to three months. Otherwise, you’re just transferring bacteria to your mouth. The best way to brush is by placing your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle against your gums and gently moving it in a circular motion, rather than a back-and-forth motion. Grip the toothbrush like a pencil so you won’t scrub too hard.

    1. Clean your tongue

    Use a tongue scraper every morning to remove tongue plaque and freshen your breath. One major cause of bad breath is the buildup of bacteria on the tongue, which a daily tongue scraping will help banish. Plus, using a tongue scraper is more effective than brushing your tongue with a toothbrush.

    1. Eat ‘detergent’ foods

    Foods that are firm or crisp help clean teeth as they’re eaten. Apples are known as nature’s toothbrush; other choices include raw carrots, celery, and popcorn. For best results, make ‘detergent’ foods the final food you eat in your meal if you know you won’t be able to brush your teeth right after eating. Also, foods such as celery, apples, pears, and carrots trigger lots of saliva, which helps wash away food debris on your teeth. Chewing sugarless gum is a tooth-cleansing action and also triggers saliva. A bonus from all that saliva: It neutralizes the acid that causes tooth decay. With teeth, more saliva is better all around.

    1. Gargle with apple cider vinegar

    Do this in the morning and then brush as usual. The vinegar helps help remove stains, whiten teeth, and kill bacteria in your mouth and gums.

    1. Brush your teeth with baking soda once a week

    This will remove stains and whiten your teeth. Use it just as you would toothpaste. You can also use salt as an alternative toothpaste. Just be sure to spit it out so it doesn’t count as sodium intake! Also, if your gums start to feel raw, switch to brushing with salt every other day.

    1. Stay fresh

    To check the freshness of your breath, lick your palm and smell it while it’s still wet. If you smell something, it’s time for a sugar-free breath mint. Shopping for mouthwash? Make sure it is alcohol-free. Most over-the-counter mouthwashes have too much alcohol, which can dry out the tissues in your mouth, making them more susceptible to bacteria.

    1. Practice flossing with your eyes shut

    If you can floss without having to guide your work with a mirror, you can floss in your car (but not while driving!), at your desk, while in bed, and before important meetings. In which case, buy several packages of floss and scatter them in your car, your desk, your purse, your briefcase, your nightstand.

    1. Brush your teeth when you first get out of bed and before you get back in at night

    They’re the two most crucial times, says Kathleen W. Wilson, M.D., an internist at the Ochsner Health Center in New Orleans and author of When You Think You Are Falling Apart. That’s because saliva (which keeps cavity-causing plaque off teeth) dries up at night, so it’s best to have all plaque cleaned off the teeth before sleep. It’s also important to brush first thing in the morning to brush off plaque and bacteria (morning breath!) that may have built up as you slept.

    1. Whitening toothpastes and rinses

    How to get stains off your teeth? Over-the-counter toothpastes, gels, and rinses help remove some surface stains. Many of these products contain mild abrasives, chemicals, or polishing agents. Unlike bleaches, they don’t change the natural color of teeth.

    1. Tooth whitening and dental work

    Approach tooth whitening with caution if you have lots of dental veneers, bonding, fillings, crowns, and bridges. Bleach will not lighten these manufactured teeth – meaning they will stand out among your newly whitened natural teeth. In order to match your whiter teeth, you may need to investigate new dental work, including veneers or bonding.

    1. Preventing Teeth Stains

    As we age, the outer layer of tooth enamel wears away. The underlying layer, called dentin, is yellower. That’s why it’s important to try to avoid staining teeth in the first place, especially after whitening. If you take care with foods and drinks that discolor teeth, the results of whitening may last up to one year. Whitening teeth too often could make them look translucent and blue, so you’ll want to maintain your new smile.

    Source: WebMD, Readers Digest (Stealth Health)

    • 04 JAN 17
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    7 Resolutions to Help You Improve Your Smile in 2017

    Happy girl laughing against a colorful tiles background. Concept of joy

    Breaking the Worst Habits for Your Teeth

    Happy New Year! The holidays have come-to-a-close, yet winter remains for another 2-3 months. It’s the perfect time for reflection at another year gone by and making resolutions for the one to come. Self-improvement is a great way to make these cold winter nights a little bit brighter after all. Maybe you’re finally ready to quit that bad habit or you’re planning that trip you’ve always wanted to take. There are a ton of ways you can improve your smile if you stop to think about it.

    The trick to making your teeth healthy is not necessarily expensive dental work, unless of course you already have a dental problem that needs addressing. The very first step is a consultation with your dentist. A hygiene appointment and x-rays are affordable and serve as an excellent starting point. You can talk to your hygienist about a customized treatment plan at home to make 2017 the year of improving your dental health.

    1. Brush More Often

    Brushing your teeth is crucial to good dental care. Professionals recommend that you brush your teeth . at least twice a day. When making your resolution, brushing more might seem daunting, but there are a couple things you can do to keep your schedule. And don’t forget to keep your family brushing regularly too, especially from an early age.

    You may also consider a travel toothbrush for your office or work to keep your brushing routine regular. The trick to making a regular brushing schedule stick is set reminders for yourself the first few weeks on your phone or watch. Hopefully after a few weeks of practice, brushing two to three times a day will feel like second nature.

    1. Floss Every Day

    No matter your age, flossing once each-and-every day is the BEST way to insure a healthy smile. Dental floss is stronger and easier to use than ever, and there are flossing aides like flossing picks and Waterpik available as alternatives if you find it difficult to start. If you haven’t flossed in a while, you might find it cumbersome or even painful to the point of it causing your gums to bleed. This is normal, for a time, however if bleeding continues more than a week or two you probably have gingivitis and should consult with your dentist.

    1. Eat (& Drink) Better

    The most popular resolution each year is diet. We all want to look better, improve our physical appearance and become healthier. Your oral health effects the rest of your body and your appearance, and yet it is often forgotten when it comes to eating habits. Sure, we know sugar is bad and vegetables are good, but are you making sure you brush every time you drink a sugary drink or stain your teeth with coffee or red wine?

    Avoiding certain food and drink in your diet isn’t the only thing you can do. Eating those vegetables, nuts, fruits and other foods with antioxidants helps to reduce inflammation and fight bacteria that can lead to gum disease. They also help with nutrition in most diets, as to not get in the way of shedding those extra pounds. Think of it as one more reason to get healthy this year!

    1. Curb Bad Habits

    Nervous habits and addictions are bad for your teeth. Smoking for instance will stain your teeth, damage your gums and can cause oral cancer, and that’s just for starters. Coffee addicts will notice considerable staining to their teeth over time and if you chew your nails or lips you might find yourself with sores, increased risk of infection and damage to enamel.

    Breaking a habit is always an uphill battle, but there’s no better time than the start of the new year. If you needed one more reason to drop the cigarettes, cut back on caffeine or find other ways to keep your hands busy and out of your mouth, your dental health is it. Cigarettes in particular, will be the biggest challenge and you can speak to your dentist for suggestions on breaking the chemical dependency over time. Dental friendly chewing gum is a great place to start in most cases.

    1. Get Your Oral Cancer Screening

    Our dentists recommend an annual check-up for oral cancer. Every year thousands of people die from oral cancer and most of those cases are treatable if found early. When you visit, our dental care team will check for bumps and inflammation that may be an early sign of cancer. Oral cancer is on the rise due to HPV or the human papillomavirus. Screening only needs to be conducted annually but at the very least be sure to ask for a screening every few visits to the dentist.

    1. Set a Schedule

    What is the single most important step in making dental health as a resolution stick? Sticking to the schedule of course. Not only do you need to set a personal, daily schedule for yourself and your family, but you’ll also need to set a schedule with your dentist. Every patient has different dental needs, but the average, healthy person should see the dentist for cleaning and an exam every six months, regardless of age.

    Seeing a dentist regularly for smaller, routine care has proven to be more cost effective than waiting for restorative care. It’s especially worth considering a set schedule with your dentist if you have insurance benefits of some kind or if you are nervous about fillings or root canals. With a regular cleaning schedule at home that involves flossing, brushing and a healthy diet, visiting your dentist AT LEAST twice a year is the final and crucial piece to a perfect smile.

    1. Smile More

    It might seem simple, but we don’t smile enough. Maybe you don’t smile because you’re shy or because you are self-conscious about your teeth. Maybe, like most of us, you don’t really remember to do it until it’s too late. Studies have shown how positive a smile can be on you and those around you. Smiling can improve productivity, energy and atmosphere at work. It can make shopping easier, and it can lead to social interaction you had closed yourself off to. If everyone made it their resolution to smile more, we could change that together.

    Source: 123Dentist.com, Colgate.com

    • 28 DEC 16
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    You Can Love Dark Chocolate and Your Teeth During the Holidays

    Chocolate Bars Close up

    Research Reveals Cocoa Extract is More Effective than Fluoride in Fighting Cavities

    Chocolate is a fun gift for holidays. While candy generally doesn’t mix well with keeping teeth healthy, dark chocolate (the kind with at least 70% cocoa) can actually be a cavity fighter. That’s obviously fantastic news for chocolate lovers.

    Recent studies emerging from Japan, England, and the U.S. support the fact that chocolate is effective at fighting cavities, plaque, and tooth decay in the mouth.

    Dark chocolate doesn’t deserve its bad rap as a cavity-causing treat. It may actually help prevent cavities! And here’s where the gauntlet gets thrown down. Compounds in chocolate may be more effective at fighting decay than fluoride. Researchers are predicting that one day, the compound found in chocolate called CBH will be used in mouthwashes and toothpaste.

    Tooth decay occurs when bacteria in the mouth turn sugar into acids, which eat away at the tooth’s surface and cause cavities. Compounds in the cocoa bean husk have an anti-bacterial effect and also fight against plaque. This makes chocolate less harmful than many other sweet foods your dentist might warn you against because the antibacterial agents in cocoa beans offset its high sugar levels.

    This research has even revealed that the cocoa extract is more effective than fluoride in fighting cavities. To many, this is shocking news, but for some that’s not saying much. Many dentists are not big fans of ingesting fluoride, and think it has long been over-hyped.

    The Compound CBH

    The compound CBH, a white crystalline powder whose chemical makeup is similar to caffeine, helps harden tooth enamel, making users less susceptible to tooth decay. This specific compound has been proven effective in the animal model, but it will it will take another two to four years before the product is approved for human use and available for sale (in the form of mouthwashes and toothpastes).

    In the meantime, however, one can “administer” this compound via the ingestion of chocolate. Eating 3 to 4 ounces of chocolate a day is a great way to take advantage of this wonder compound and lower your chance of getting cavities. What an easy and fun recommendation a doctor can make; it’s been called the food of the gods, a supposed aphrodisiac, and the drink that Casanova favored.

    Chocolate Contains Polyphenols

    Polyphenols are a class of naturally occurring chemicals that can limit oral bacteria. They are also able to neutralize the microorganisms that cause bad breath and prevent bacteria from turning sugar and starches into acid. Polyphenols have great promise for their apparent anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects as well as their ability to reduce hypertension and stroke.

    Tannins are Abundant in Chocolate

    Tannins are plant compounds that are found in many of the foods we eat. They’re also what give dark chocolate its slightly bitter taste and dark color. Tannins have been shown to help stop bacteria from sticking to teeth because their molecules bind to bacteria before plaque has time to form.

    The Flavonoid Compound Epicatechin is Found in High Quantities in Chocolate

    Flavonoids are a group of plant-based antioxidants that have been shown to slow tooth decay. A recent study by researchers at the University of California showed that a particular flavonoid called epicatechin displays a remarkable ability to reduce cholesterol, blood clots and clogged arteries.

    Cocoa not Snickers- Best Chocolate for Your Teeth

    For the best therapeutic effect (yes, we’re still talking about chocolate), it’s best to chew on cacao nibs. Most will find this option unpalatable.

    The second-best choice, is dark chocolate with less than 6-8 grams of sugar per serving – organic if possible. Be aware that chocolate is a calorie-rich food, so modify your calorie intake accordingly. Raw chocolate is even a better choice, as it is less processed, and more of the antioxidants are left intact.

    Do all of this for your teeth, but enjoy the other benefits of mood elevation and better blood flow as well!

    Again, chocolate should be at least 70% cocoa for most of these benefits to your teeth and body. However, almost any food can be eaten in moderation, as long as you remember to keep brushing regularly.

    With the recent findings, it’s now more true than ever, that chocolate is a superfood. Chocolate has over 300 chemical compounds in it, making it one of the most complex foods we know of, and it is predicted that many new compounds in chocolate beneficial to us will surface over time and cement its nutritional five-star rating.

    Source: AskTheDentist.com, TribecaPediatricDental.com

    • 22 DEC 16
    • 0

    Dental Emergencies Are a Specialty of Personal Care Dentistry

    istock_000090957655_medium-woman-with-jaw-painWhen you have a dental emergency, waiting  for an appointment is not often an option you want to consider. That’s why Personal Care Dentistry offers emergency – or same day – care! Our team and facility is equipped to help you deal with your dental emergency. If you’re in pain, don’t wait for a regular appointment, just call (651) 636-0655 to see how we can help you at our office in Roseville.

    Here’s what some of the patients who came in for emergency care had to say about their experience at Personal Care Dentistry:

     

    Always Very Happy with the Care I Received – Jeff P.

    I was able to get in on short notice to repair a broken tooth. Entire staff was very friendly, professional and efficient. I have been a patient here for 6 years since moving to St. Paul, and have always been very happy with the care that I have received there. – November 28, 2016

     

    Best Emergency Service! – Rachel P.

    I have been going to Personal Care for several years, and never had to use their emergency service until Thanksgiving, I am so grateful they have it, as they were able to get me started on antibiotics right away! They were able to get me in on Monday and I had the most enjoyable root canal (as much as one could be enjoyed anyway)! – November 28, 2016

     

    Great! – Tim B. 

    Had to get in last minute with a broken tooth before the holiday, they were able to squeeze me in and provide excellent service. – November 23. 2016

     

    Extremely High Quality and Diligent Service – Lonnie B.

    I have been a patient for over 25 years and have had nothing but wonderful results and things to say about Dr. Hunt and his team. My visit yesterday was an emergency root canal (not feeling too good). But, as always, I had absolutely a wonderful experience. I was greeted very nicely by a very friendly and helpful Lynn. Understanding my situation with a son getting married this weekend, my emergency was all handled in the same day by an always excellent Dr. Hunt and his very capable assistant Tiffany. They went to work right away and I could not be happier with the diligence shown from the time I walked in the door to getting the emergency handled to walking out the door with a cup of coffee. Thanks so much. Lonnie. – November 9, 2016

     

    First Impressions Mean So Much – I Would Recommend Them, Without Reservation – Mark V.

    “I had damaged a tooth over the weekend and was in serious need of some emergency work. Made a call to Personal Care Dentistry and they were able to get me in fairly quickly. The reception staff was courteous and friendly and the new patient paperwork was simple and straightforward. My wait in the waiting room was pleasantly brief and was able to get in exam chair within minutes. The dental assistants were friendly and professional. The dentist was also pleasant and professional. There was no scolding over the condition of my teeth…no lectures, etc. The dental team did their preliminaries smoothly and efficiently and a course of action was quickly formed. I was appreciative of them administering pain relievers and numbing agents right away before anything else, because the pain I had been experiencing was an 11 on a scale of 1 to 10. They explained the actions they were going to take, asked if I had any questions, and throughout the whole procedure kept asking for feedback to make sure my experience was as painless as possible. They were able to take care of the critical things within the space of an hour and a half. All in all, and truthfully, it was the most pleasant, positive and relatively painless visit I have ever had to a dental office. The rooms were light and airy and comfortable. Interestingly enough, on a side note, my neighbor also happened to be there. That speaks something given the size of the community. Based on this first personal experience with this office, first impressions mean much no matter the trade, I would recommend them, without reservation.” – September 12, 2016