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    • 13 SEP 17
    • 0

    8 Reasons Why Our Patients Love Going to the Dentist

    If you’re looking for a dentist in the Roseville area who blends the latest technology with a gentle touch in a warm, caring and compassionate atmosphere, then Personal Care Dentistry is just the place for you. Here’s 8 reasons why our patients love going to Personal Care Dentistry (and actual patient reviews about each reason):

     

    The Golden Rule

     At Personal Care Dentistry, we care for our patients the same way we would care for our families – with compassion, respect and the highest quality. For 40 years, we’ve blended the latest technology with a gentle touch in a warm, caring atmosphere. It’s why we consistently receive outstanding reviews from our patients.

    “Always so friendly and they truly care. This is coming from a person who really does not like going to the dentist. They have changed that.” – Sharon L.

     

    Same Day Care

     If you chip or crack a tooth, or suffer some other dental emergency, Personal Care Dentistry is the place to call. We have four decades of providing high-quality same day dentistry.

    “Woke up with a bad tooth ache and they got me in that morning and got it taken care of. Always polite and friendly people who make you feel at ease.” – Andrew H.

     

    Award Winning

     Our never-ending quest for excellence in dental care has resulted in a chest full of awards from fellow dentists and consumers, including:

    ‘Top Dentist’ by Minneapolis St. Paul Magazine for 4 consecutive years;

    ‘Top Dentist’ by Roseville Review readers for 8 years;

    ‘Top Dentist’ by Minnesota Monthly for the last two years;

    Angie’s List Super Service award for four consecutive years.

    “The staff at Personal Care Dentistry is unlike any other health care clinic I have ever visited. They are always helpful, kind, and compassionate. They make going to the dentist something to look forward to!” – Kayla S.

     

    Care for All Ages

     Our patients know that they can bring their entire family – from 3-year-olds to grandparents – for dental care at our clinic. We’ve been treating families since 1977 with genuine, state-of-the-art care.

    “My 3-year-old son has high anxiety about the dentist. I decided to take him to Personal Care Dentistry because my husband and I are both patients and love all of the staff. My son’s hygienist at PCD was amazing with him. She was warm and funny while still being professional. She made the entire time enjoyable and did a great job cleaning his teeth. Not one tear and all smiles. Dr. Kyle came in to check on him and also did a great job putting him at ease. Personal Care Dentistry is excellent and is now our entire family’s dentist office.”  – Michelle M.

     

    Our Dental Care Team

     Our dentists, hygienists and front desk staff receive consistently high reviews from our patients. Our care team members are all dedicated to providing the very highest quality care possible to our patients.

    “Great experience! It’d been like 7 years since my last cleaning so I was a bit nervous about how this was going to go. The staff was super friendly, professional, and welcoming. No judgement, no lecture – just great care and supportive encouragement to return and maintain a regular cleaning schedule. I will definitely be returning in spring! Jenna and Dr. Kyle are the best!” – Gail H.

     

    Timely & Efficient Care

     Our waiting room is usually empty – not because of a lack of patients, but because we get them into our treatment rooms as quickly as possible! At Personal Care Dentistry, we recognize that your time is valuable and our care team works tirelessly to be perceptive to our patient’s busy schedules and provide quick, quality care.

    “This practice is a perfect balance between friendly providers and efficient and thorough procedures. I was in and out in 45 minutes – it made me appreciate the practice’s provider protocols.” – Beth A.

     

    We Know How to Handle Dental Anxiety

     If you’re one of the 50% of Americans who fear going to the dentist, then Personal Care Dentistry is the place for you. We cater to patients with dental anxiety of fear by providing trusted, non-judgemental care in a warm, gentle, compassionate atmosphere. We take the time to listen to you and help you overcome your anxiety.

     “I have pretty high anxiety about visiting the dentist and had a wonderful experience here both times. The staff was understanding and caring, while thoroughly explaining what was happening. Would highly recommend this practice.” – Ryann S.

     

    Early Morning & Evening Appointments

    Whether you’re an ‘early bird or night owl,’ we can accommodate you. We open as early as 6:30 a.m. and stay open as late as 8 p.m. We are dedicated to making sure our services are as easily available as possible.

     “I always try to get an early appointment. It’s such a great start to my day to see everyone so happy and cheerful at 6:30 a.m. I always look forward to my visit because it makes the rest of my day happy and cheerful too!” – Bob H.

     

    • 06 SEP 17
    • 0

    All About Cavities – Prevention & Treatment

    Inside your mouth are millions of bacteria. Many of them are healthy and good for your overall oral wellness. Yet others build up into a sticky film that coats your teeth and is called plaque. Plaque is the destructive force that creates cavities.

    The Making of a Cavity

    When we eat and drink the bacteria in our mouths create acids that seep under plaque and eat away at the protective layer of our teeth. The acid destroys minerals from a tooth’s enamel and decay begins. When the enamel is broken down the decay can penetrate the dentin (the core substance of a tooth) and start destroying the sensitive nerve fibers inside.

    Signs of a Cavity

    Abnormal white spots on a tooth

    Tooth sensitivity to hot or cold

    Dull throbbing in the affected area

    Tooth pain

    Other Destructive Effects of a Cavity

    Complications from uncontrolled decay can destroy a tooth completely. When the decay spreads to the root of a tooth an infection may occur becoming what is called an abscess. An abscess can spread its infection throughout the body and cause serious (sometimes life threatening) health conditions in other areas of the body. In severe cases an infection that seeps into the blood stream can manifest in the brain or pulmonary (heart) system. Plaque that forms near the gum line can also cause gum disease.

    Treating a Cavity                                                                 

    Depending on the stage of the cavity there are various treatments to either reverse the effects or stop it completely.

    Early stages of a cavity are typically painless and may need fluoride or other simple, non-invasive treatments to help the tooth remineralize and heal itself. Teeth can also be sealed to help prevent more cavities if a person is somehow more prone to getting them.

    If there are breaks in the enamel a dentist will have to repair the damage with a filling. A drill or laser may be used, the decay is removed and the tooth is filled.

    If the nerve or root pulp is infected and the outside of the tooth can be saved, the dentist will perform root canal treatment. The pulp will be removed and replaced with an inert material. In most cases a crown will be needed to cap the tooth. A complete extraction (removal) of the tooth may be needed in situations where too much of the tooth is destroyed and cannot be salvaged.

    Preventing Cavities

    Cavity prevention is relatively easy and does not require a large time commitment. It needs to be done both at home by the individual and with professional cleaning in the dentist’s office.

    Brush twice a day for the recommended two minutes.

    Floss twice a day. It can be done right before or after brushing.

    Chew sugarless gum with xylitol. Xylitol does not create the harmful acid that sugar does and has shown cavity fighting properties. Sugarless gum also acts like a floss, getting food out of the spaces in between teeth.

    Rinse your mouth with water after every meal. This can be done nearly anywhere and anytime to help stimulate saliva flow and swish away many stubborn food particles.

    Make regular dental appointments every six months. A professional cleaning by a hygienist keeps plaque at bay. X-rays and an examination by a dentist can catch cavities early.

    Source: Colgate

     

    • 29 AUG 17
    • 0

    Tips to a Brighter Smile

    Discoloration of Tooth Enamel Has Many Causes and Several Solutions

    The color of your teeth is related to a variety of factors. Genetics is one reason your teeth are the shade they are, but there are other contributors to color. Discoloration may be caused by stains on the surface or by changes inside the tooth.

    Three Types of Tooth Discoloration

    Extrinsic — These are stains on the outer enamel of teeth from the oral intake of staining agents such as smoking or drinking wine, coffee or soda.

    Intrinsic — This is when the inner structure of the tooth (the dentin) becomes exposed or darkens. You can get this type of discoloration from:

    Overexposure to fluoride during early childhood.

    Trauma to your permanent or baby teeth.

    Exposure to tetracycline antibiotics while your mother was pregnant with you or as a child before age 8 years old.

    A rare condition called dentinogenesis imperfecta that causes discoloration.

    Age-Related — Over the years tooth enamel becomes worn and allows the yellow color of dentin (core material of teeth) to show through. Routine chewing, grinding and gnashing causes millions of micro-cracks in enamel that can fill up with debris and hold stains causing a dullness in teeth over time.

    TREATMENT OPTIONS

    Whether you consider professional whitening for best results in the shortest amount of time or a slower over the counter method to save money, there are a myriad of options to whiten dull and discolored teeth. The FDA has differentiated “whitening” products as removing dirt and debris to restore a tooth’s natural color while “bleaching” refers to products that contain actual bleach and can whiten teeth beyond natural color.

    At Home Methods

    Whitening Toothpastes: These may remove minor stains, but they do not actually change the overall color of your teeth.

    Whitening Products Over the Counter: These whiteners are weaker than the products you can get from your dentist. The whitening agent is applied as a gel placed in a mouthpiece or as a strip that sticks to your teeth. Over-the-counter mouthpieces fit less securely than the kind you get from your dentist, but they will lighten your teeth over time.

    Professional Whitening

    Power Bleaching: A procedure using carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel that can be applied in-office or by the patient. Some in-office treatments utilize whitening light and show improved color in as little as 35-45 minutes.

    Dentist Grade Whitening Trays: You will use a stronger, concentrated bleaching gel and a mouth guard given to you by your dentist.

    Composite Bonding Materials: A tooth can be covered by a dentist with bonding materials to match color.

    Veneers: These are thin ceramic shells that cover the outer surfaces of the teeth to cover cosmetic imperfections and match color.

    Give the care team at Personal Care Dentistry a call if you are interested in finding out more about your options to brighten your smile.

    Source: Colgate, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)           

     

    • 29 AUG 17
    • 0

    New Patient Special – $40

    We’re pleased to offer our special 40th Anniversary New Patient Special for $40

    Only in September 2017

    Offer details, conditions, and restrictions:

    New patients only. Includes thorough cleaning, comprehensive exam by the doctor, and four (4) bitewing x-rays. Periodontal treatment not included. Call for complete details, other restrictions may apply, cannot be combined with other offers. Offer valid through 9/30/2017.

    • 29 AUG 17
    • 0

    $40 New Patient Special in September

    We’re pleased to offer our special 40th Anniversary New Patient Special for $40

    Only in September 2017

    Offer details, conditions, and restrictions:

    New patients only. Includes thorough cleaning, comprehensive exam by the doctor, and four (4) bitewing x-rays. Periodontal treatment not included. Call for complete details, other restrictions may apply, cannot be combined with other offers. Offer valid through 9/30/2017.

     

    • 24 AUG 17
    • 0

    Tips to Keep Your Oral Hygiene Routine from Becoming Stale

    A report published by Delta Dental found that almost 70% of Americans brush their teeth at least twice a day. That’s a great statistic for those who adhere to the recommended routine, but looking at that number also reveals a more pressing issue: more than 30 percent aren’t brushing enough. Also, 23 percent of Americans have gone two or more days without brushing.

    Another alarming finding from the study showed only 40% of Americans floss daily and as many as 20 percent never floss. Many people with these bad habits make excuses to their dentists and others swear they will start doing it immediately. Fortunately, it is never too late to get back on track and following through.

    Great Ways to Stay on Track

    Create a chart to track your progress. Be sure to check off each day you meet your goals, which will give you a visual of your improvements. This works great for families – it can help keep each other on track.

    Remember it’s time to brush your teeth by setting a repeating alarm on your phone.

    There are some wonderful phone apps available to download to help you stay on track with your dental regimen. These include Virtual Dentist, Brush DJ, Brush Teeth or Text2Floss.

    Develop an Effective Oral Hygiene Regimen

    Most of your dental care is done at home by you. If you are willing to practice good dental care every day, you’ll keep decay and periodontal disease at bay. Here are some tips on the basics:

    Find dental products you like. Let everyone in your family choose the dental products they like as long as they meet their oral health needs. That means tooth brushes, toothpaste and floss. You’ll get more daily brushing and flossing from your family members if you take this approach.

    Brush and floss twice a day. Brush your teeth properly with a soft toothbrush for a total of 4-6 minutes daily. And be sure to floss as well. If you haven’t flossed in a while, the first week back flossing may leave your gums a bit tender. The tenderness will stop if you stick with it. Watch television while flossing to take your mind off the tenderness.

    Pay attention to what you eat and drink. Sugar feeds the growth of plaque, which leads to cavities. Be careful when you consume sodas and other sugar-laden drinks and remember that many foods have a high sugar content. Avoid high sugar foods and drinks and instead keep foods healthy for your teeth in the kitchen for snacks. Nuts, cheeses, yogurt, raw vegetables and water are great for your oral health.

    Rinse with water after eating. Rinsing your mouth with water after you eat washes away food particles from your teeth and gums. Remember, food particles that mingle with bacteria in your mouth produce harmful acids that eat away at your teeth.

    Schedule your regular dental appointments! Come in every six months for a cleaning and check up!

     

    Sources: American Dental Association, Delta Dental, Colgate, Techflier.com

     

    • 09 AUG 17
    • 0

    Personal Care Dentistry School Supplies Drive

     

    Wondering what to donate? We have a link below to a handy list for you to review! Or you can print out the same list below on our blog.

    And during August, if you drop off at least five school supplies:

    Your next hygiene visit is just $69 if you are a cash patient .

    You’ll receive a free fluoride treatment if you are an insurance patient.

    Or just donate because you want to help students in need!

    Also, for every new patient referred by a current patient in August, Personal Care Dentistry will be donating a backpack to a needy student.

    School supplies can be dropped off at Personal Care Dentistry.

    Brimhall School Supplies 2017-18

    • 09 AUG 17
    • 0

    The Super Seven – Foods Good for Your Oral Health

    We have seven super foods for your oral health in our latest Personal Care Dentistry blog. From nuts to chocolate, these foods strengthen your teeth and gums, fight bacteria in your mouth, and scrub or wash away cavity-causing sugars. Eat or drink these “super seven” and you are bound to have a happier smile!

    Fruits and Vegies that Crunch

    The high fiber in certain fruits and vegetables are like mini “scrubbers” in your mouth, replicating some of the work your toothbrush does by cleaning your teeth. Plus, they trigger saliva production in your mouth, which is a great way to wash away bacteria that have gathered on your teeth. In addition, any sugar in your mouth from other foods you’ve eaten will have a harder time sticking around, because the increased saliva will wash away that sugar. Raw celery, carrots, apples, broccoli, cauliflower and jicama are some of these oral health helpers.

    Chocolate…Yes, Chocolate!

    Believe it or not, dark chocolate (at least 70% cacao) can be good for your smile if you eat it in moderation. Research has shown that a compound in dark chocolate actually hardens tooth enamel and can help prevent cavities. One square a day is enough – and we’re talking dark chocolate, not milk chocolate!

    Cheese Please

    Cheese is high in protein and calcium and low in sugar – a good combination for oral health. It also has been shown to lower the acidity in your mouth – and the lower acidity level, the lower the chance of developing cavities. Another benefit is that cheese helps remineralize the teeth and minimize decay. Milk is also a good choice for oral health, since it contains protein and calcium and helps wash away sugar from other foods (that glass of milk with dessert is a good combination for oral health).

    Be a Fan of Tea

    Both black and green teas are high in polyphenols, which kill or suppress bacteria in your mouth. Remember, bacteria produce acids which destroy your tooth enamel. They feed on sugar in your mouth, so having tea during or after your meal will fight the bacteria, wash away sugar, and replenish your saliva. That’s a trio of good benefits from tea.

    Foods from the Sea

    What do sea foods have in common? They are lean in protein and they contain natural fluoride. The combination strengthens your teeth and helps prevent cavities. A bonus is that they are a great source of Vitamin D, which helps your body absorb calcium in your diet. Calcium helps your teeth and gums fight disease which can lead to oral health problems.

    All Kinds of Nuts

    Nuts provide a healthy dose of protein, which your teeth and gums benefit from. They also are loaded with calcium and phosphorus – both good for tooth enamel. And the “crunch” of nuts produces saliva in your mouth, which washes away bad stuff in your mouth.

    The Wonders of Water

    We’ve mentioned multiple times in our blog how important the production of saliva is for your oral health. Water is just as good for a variety of reasons. First, it replenishes your saliva (which is nearly 100% water) and hydrates your mouth. Second, the right amount of saliva in your mouth helps break down food you eat, reduces acid produced by bacteria, and slows down tooth decay. All of those are good for your smile.

    SOURCES: Colgate.com

    • 07 AUG 17
    • 0

    Periodontal Disease Is Not Something You Want in Your Mouth

    Here’s Four Simple Tips to Stop Periodontal Disease

    Did you know that nearly 50% of all Americans have some form of periodontal disease (also called gum disease)? If you are among those 50%, then you should be paying attention to how to get rid of it in your mouth. If you are not careful, periodontal disease can lead to bone loss.

    So what is periodontal disease? “Peri” means around, and “odontal” refers to teeth. Periodontal diseases are infections of the structures around the teeth. These include the gums, the cementum that covers the root, the periodontal ligament and the alveolar bone. The three stages — from least to most severe — are gingivitis, periodontitis and advanced periodontitis. In its most mild form, the disease can be seen as inflammation of the gum tissue. In more severe cases it results in major damage to soft tissue and bone, and can even lead to loss of teeth. Whether you are dealing with bleeding gums or bone loss, you can take action to prevent periodontal disease from progressing.

    What Causes Periodontal Disease?

    One of the biggest culprits of periodontal disease is inadequate brushing and flossing. Both are important in getting rid of plaque-causing bacteria from the mouth. Additional risk factors include diabetes, other illnesses, use of certain medications, hormonal changes in women and genetic susceptibility. The best way to avoid periodontal disease is by maintaining good oral health.

    What Are the Stages of Periodontal Disease?

    The first stage is gingivitis, which is inflammation of the gums. Warning signs include red and swollen gums that may bleed easily. Gingivitis is a mild form of periodontal disease that can be remedied by regular brushing, flossing and cleanings by your dental hygienist. Gum disease at this stage does not include bone and tissue loss.

    Periodontitis presents itself when gingivitis is not properly addressed. The inflammation has now moved from just being in the gums to being around the tooth. Gum tissue moves away from the tooth and forms pockets of infection. In advanced periodontitis the bones, gums, and tissue that support the teeth can be destroyed.

    How Do You Prevent Periodontal Disease?

    Prevention is key in avoiding any disease including periodontal disease. Taking care of yourself now will help in preventing problems in the future. Good oral health is more than fighting bad breath and having clean teeth. It is a reflection of your self esteem and how you take care of the rest of your body. Get a jumpstart on prevention and keep yourself looking and feeling young and healthy!

    Prevent periodontal disease by implementing the following habits:

    Brush your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste

    Floss regularly to remove plaque from between the teeth

    Visit your dentist every six months for your routine check-up and cleaning

    Don’t smoke

    Pay attention to these four easy tips, and you will have healthy and happy gums and teeth and a winning smile. And periodontal disease won’t be a problem for you.

    Source: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

    • 03 AUG 17
    • 0

    Please Join Personal Care Dentistry in a School Supplies Drive

    Please join us in helping elementary school students in need by donating school supplies in August. Donate at least 5 school supplies and:

    Your next hygiene visit is just $69 if you are a cash patient .

    Or receive a free fluoride treatment if you are an insurance patient.

    Or just donate because you want to help students in need!

    Also, for every new patient referred by current patient in August, Personal Care Dentistry will be donating a backpack to a needy student.

    We have a link below to a school supplies list from Brimhall Elementary School, one of the schools near our clinic, if you want more information about what exactly you should donate.

    School supplies can be dropped off at Personal Care Dentistry.

    Brimhall School Supplies List 2017-18

    • 02 AUG 17
    • 0

    Brighten Your Smile with These 9 Easy Tips

    Tired of not feeling like you can smile because your teeth are stained yellow or tinted a dull gray? We have 9 tips to help bring the luster back to your smile, ranging from eating teeth-whitening foods to avoiding beverages that discolor your smile.

    1. Go on a pearly white diet

    If you like to drink beverages like black tea or red wine, expect the results to impact your smile. Colas, gravies, and dark juices also will affect your pearly whites – and so will cigars and cigarettes. Remember, if it’s dark before you consume it, then it will stain your teeth. Brush right away after eating or drinking foods that can stain your teeth.

    1. Eat foods that scrub

    Firm or crisp foods help clean your teeth as they are eaten. Among the best are apples, which are known as “nature’s toothbrush.” Other good choices include raw carrots and celery, plus popcorn. For best results, make ‘scrubbing’ foods the final food you eat in your meal if you aren’t going to brush right after your meal. In addition, look for foods that trigger a lot of saliva, which is your mouth’s way of washing away food debris. These foods include apples, pears, celery and carrots. In addition, if you chew sugarless gum after you eat, you will get a tooth-cleansing action and it will also trigger saliva production. The  saliva also neutralizes the acid that creates tooth decay.

    1. Use nature’s mouthwash – apple cider vinegar

    Apple cider vinegar helps remove stains, whiten teeth, and kill bacteria in your mouth and gums. Swish it around your mouth before you brush in the morning.

    1. Include baking soda and/or salt when you brush your teeth

    Baking soda will remove stains and whiten your teeth. Brush with it once a week – use it just like toothpaste. As an alternative to brushing with toothpaste daily, you can use salt. If you find your gums are starting to feel raw, switch to brushing with salt every other day.

    1. Replace your toothbrush

    Replace your manual toothbrush every three months – and the same goes for your electric toothbrush. If you keep using the same toothbrush, you’re just putting bacteria back in your mouth daily. The best way to brush is by placing your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle against your gums and gently moving it in a circular motion, rather than a back-and-forth motion.

    1. Learn to floss anytime and anywhere

    Flossing doesn’t have to be something you do at home in front of the mirror in your bathroom. If you can learn to floss without a mirror, it means you can floss anywhere – your car (not while you’re driving, though), at the office, in a park, or in bed (by yourself!). Be sure to buy multiple containers of floss and keep them in your vehicle, your desk , in your nightstand, or in your purse or briefcase.

    1. Brush at strategic times

    When you first get up and just before you go to bed are the two best times to brush your teeth. Why? Because saliva dries up when you sleep, it’s smart to get all of the plaque off your teeth before bed time. Remember, plaque causes cavities. In the morning, brush right away to remove plaque and bacteria from your teeth.

    1. Give whitening toothpastes and rinses a try

    Some stains on your teeth can be removed with whitening toothpastes, gels, and rinses. They often contain abrasives, chemicals, or polishing agents to help whiten your teeth. And unlike bleaches, they don’t change the natural color of teeth.

    1. Try tooth whitening bleaches – but be careful

    If you decide to use a tooth whitening bleach, be careful. Bleach won’t lighten dental veneers, bonding, fillings, crowns, and bridges. This means that they will look odd next to your natural teeth that you just had whitened. If you take care with foods and drinks that discolor teeth, the results of whitening may last up to one year. Whitening teeth too often could make them look translucent and blue, so you’ll want to maintain your new smile.

    Source: WebMD, Readers Digest (Stealth Health)

    • 02 AUG 17
    • 0

    Brighten Your Smile with These 9 Easy Tips

    Tired of not feeling like you can smile because your teeth are stained yellow or tinted a dull gray? We have 9 tips to help bring the luster back to your smile, ranging from eating teeth-whitening foods to avoiding beverages that discolor your smile.

    1. Go on a pearly white diet

    If you like to drink beverages like black tea or red wine, expect the results to impact your smile. Colas, gravies, and dark juices also will affect your pearly whites – and so will cigars and cigarettes. Remember, if it’s dark before you consume it, then it will stain your teeth. Brush right away after eating or drinking foods that can stain your teeth.

    1. Eat foods that scrub

    Firm or crisp foods help clean your teeth as they are eaten. Among the best are apples, which are known as “nature’s toothbrush.” Other good choices include raw carrots and celery, plus popcorn. For best results, make ‘scrubbing’ foods the final food you eat in your meal if you aren’t going to brush right after your meal. In addition, look for foods that trigger a lot of saliva, which is your mouth’s way of washing away food debris. These foods include apples, pears, celery and carrots. In addition, if you chew sugarless gum after you eat, you will get a tooth-cleansing action and it will also trigger saliva production. The  saliva also neutralizes the acid that creates tooth decay.

    1. Use nature’s mouthwash – apple cider vinegar

    Apple cider vinegar helps remove stains, whiten teeth, and kill bacteria in your mouth and gums. Swish it around your mouth before you brush in the morning.

    1. Include baking soda and/or salt when you brush your teeth

    Baking soda will remove stains and whiten your teeth. Brush with it once a week – use it just like toothpaste. As an alternative to brushing with toothpaste daily, you can use salt. If you find your gums are starting to feel raw, switch to brushing with salt every other day.

    1. Replace your toothbrush

    Replace your manual toothbrush every three months – and the same goes for your electric toothbrush. If you keep using the same toothbrush, you’re just putting bacteria back in your mouth daily. The best way to brush is by placing your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle against your gums and gently moving it in a circular motion, rather than a back-and-forth motion.

    1. Learn to floss anytime and anywhere

    Flossing doesn’t have to be something you do at home in front of the mirror in your bathroom. If you can learn to floss without a mirror, it means you can floss anywhere – your car (not while you’re driving, though), at the office, in a park, or in bed (by yourself!). Be sure to buy multiple containers of floss and keep them in your vehicle, your desk , in your nightstand, or in your purse or briefcase.

    1. Brush at strategic times

    When you first get up and just before you go to bed are the two best times to brush your teeth. Why? Because saliva dries up when you sleep, it’s smart to get all of the plaque off your teeth before bed time. Remember, plaque causes cavities. In the morning, brush right away to remove plaque and bacteria from your teeth.

    1. Give whitening toothpastes and rinses a try

    Some stains on your teeth can be removed with whitening toothpastes, gels, and rinses. They often contain abrasives, chemicals, or polishing agents to help whiten your teeth. And unlike bleaches, they don’t change the natural color of teeth.

    1. Try tooth whitening bleaches – but be careful

    If you decide to use a tooth whitening bleach, be careful. Bleach won’t lighten dental veneers, bonding, fillings, crowns, and bridges. This means that they will look odd next to your natural teeth that you just had whitened. If you take care with foods and drinks that discolor teeth, the results of whitening may last up to one year. Whitening teeth too often could make them look translucent and blue, so you’ll want to maintain your new smile.

    Source: WebMD, Readers Digest (Stealth Health)